Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/205508
Authors: 
McCann, Philip
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
New Zealand Treasury Working Paper No. 03/03
Abstract: 
This paper discusses the latest thinking in the relationships between the economics of trade, geography and industrial clusters. The aim of the paper is to explain the relevance of these various arguments for the economy of New Zealand and to suggest a possible public policy role for overcoming the growth problems associated with geographic periphery. As we will see, much of the current thinking on the relationships between geography, trade and clusters implies that New Zealand's long-term growth prospects are rather weak. However, it will be argued here that a detailed consideration of these relationships, plus some evidence from the UK, also provides some guidance as to possible strategies which New Zealand can employ to promote growth. In particular, the development of public policies which are specifically aimed at reducing the spatial market-area constraints of the New Zealand small-firm sector may be worthwhile.
Subjects: 
trade
geography
clusters
exports
public policy
JEL: 
R11
F12
L14
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
214.82 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.