Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/204358
Authors: 
Henningsen, Géraldine
Henningsen, Arne
Henning, Christian H.C.A.
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IFRO Working Paper No. 2013/11
Abstract: 
All business transactions as well as achieving innovations take up resources, subsumed under the concept of transaction costs. One of the major factors in transaction costs theory is information. Firm networks can catalyse the interpersonal information exchange and hence, increase the access to non-public information so that transaction costs are reduced. Many resources that are sacrificed for transaction costs are inputs that also enter the technical production process. As most production data do not distinguish between these two usages of inputs, high transaction costs result in reduced observed productivity. We empirically analyse the effect of networks on productivity using a cross-validated local linear non-parametric regression technique and a data set of 384 farms in Poland. Our empirical study generally supports our hypothesis that networks affect productivity. Large and dense trading networks and dense information networks and household networks have a positive impact on a farm's productivity. A bootstrapping procedure confirms that this result is statistically significant.
Subjects: 
Information networks
Transaction Costs
Non-parametric estimation
Productivity analysis
JEL: 
D22
D23
D24
L14
Q12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.