Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/199199
Authors: 
Brandi, Clara
Cabani, Tobias
Hosang, Christoph
Schirmbeck, Sonja
Westermann, Lotte
Wiese, Hannah
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Studies 74
Abstract: 
Palm oil production is currently the focus of contentious debate. On the one hand, it yields positive socio-economic impacts and can be a powerful engine for rural development. On the other hand, it can generate severe negative impacts regarding ecological and social sustainability. Sustainability concerns have spurred numerous efforts to introduce standards and certification schemes for palm oil, including ISPO (Indonesian Sustainable Palm Oil) and RSPO (Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil). Yet, potential large-scale ecological benefits of sustainability standards concerning reduced deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions are difficult to achieve. In order to make the palm oil sector more sustainable, it is essential to include the important group of smallholders in certification schemes. At the same time, smallholder certification is especially challenging as it demands capacities that smallholders often lack. This study presents findings from a research project on sustain­ability standards for smallholders in the Indonesian palm oil sector – focussing on the challenges and gaps of smallholder certification and the benefits that can be gained. It offers baseline data on smallholder certification, insights into and lessons-learnt from ongoing certification projects and input for closing existing research gaps, especially regarding challenges on the ground.
Subjects: 
Handel und Investitionen
Landwirtschaft und ländliche Entwicklung
Umwelt, Ökosysteme und Ressourcen
ISBN: 
978-3-88985-581-7
Document Type: 
Research Report

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.