Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/195256
Authors: 
Conesa, Juan C.
Kehoe, Timothy J.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] SERIEs - Journal of the Spanish Economic Association [ISSN:] 1869-4195 [Volume:] 8 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 201-223
Abstract: 
In the early 1970s, hours worked per working-age person in Spain were higher than in the United States. Starting in 1975, however, hours worked in Spain fell by 40%. We find that 80% of the decline in hours worked can be accounted for by the evolution of taxes in an otherwise standard neoclassical growth model. Although taxes play a crucial role, we cannot argue that taxes drive all of the movements in hours worked. In particular, the model underpredicts the large decrease in hours in 1975-1986 and the large increase in hours in 1994-2007. The lack of productivity growth in Spain during 1994-2015 has little impact on the model's prediction for hours worked.
Subjects: 
Dynamic general equilibrium
Hours worked
Distortionary taxes
Total factor productivity
JEL: 
C68
E13
E24
H31
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.