Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/194377
Authors: 
Lehrer, Steven F.
Ding, Weili
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Volume:] 6 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 1-23
Abstract: 
The idea that genetic differences may explain a multitude of individual-level outcomes studied by economists is far from controversial. Since more datasets now contain measures of genetic variation, it is reasonable to postulate that incorporating genomic data in economic analyses will become more common. However, there remains much debate among academics as to, first, whether ignoring genetic differences in empirical analyses biases the resulting estimates. Second, several critics argue that since genetic characteristics are immutable, the incorporation of these variables into economic analysis will not yield much policy guidance. In this paper, we revisit these concerns and survey the main avenues by which empirically oriented economic researchers have utilized measures of genetic markers to improve our understanding of economic phenomena. We discuss the strengths, limitations, and potential of existing approaches and conclude by highlighting several prominent directions forward for future research.
Subjects: 
Genetic markers
Gene-environment interactions
Genome-wide association studies
Candidate genes
Genetic instruments
Within-family variation
JEL: 
I12
J19
I26
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
489.93 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.