Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/194374
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Volume:] 5 [Issue:] 21 [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Year:] 2016 [Pages:] 1-29
Publisher: 
Springer, Heidelberg
Abstract: 
This paper empirically examines the relationship between the self-identity as Indigenous and earnings inequality in the Mexican labor market. Using Mexican Census data and a large set of wage covariates reveals the existence of an earnings penalty for self-identification as Indigenous. There is an additional and larger penalty for Indigenous persons who are fluent in an Indigenous language, regardless of Spanish language fluency. Further analyses using the Mexican Family Life Survey reveal that these earnings gaps persist after we also control for an individual's cognitive ability. Ethno-linguistic inequality is particularly strong in smaller cities and among self-employed workers.
Subjects: 
Developing country
Indigenous peoples
Demographic economics
Wage gap
Discrimination
Minorities
JEL: 
J10
J15
J31
J71
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
cc-by Logo
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.