Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/194100
Year of Publication: 
2017
Publisher: 
ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, Kiel, Hamburg
Abstract: 
We investigate the impact of empathy and impulsiveness on charitable giving using a real donation experiment. We confirm that greater empathy predicts greater charitable giving. Contrary to recent literature, however, we find a significant negative relationship between impulsiveness and donation behavior. Specifically, when financial resources are scarce, donations are more often made by decision-makers who are able to suppress an intuitively egoistic response.
Subjects: 
Empathy
Impulsiveness
Charitable Giving
Donation
Pro-Social Behavior
Additional Information: 
Copyright statement: Please note this is a pre-review version of the article Who Gives? - The Roles of Empathy and Impulsiveness published in Scharf, Kimberley, and Mirco Tonin (eds.), The Economics of Philanthropy: Donations and Fundraising, pp. 49-62. © 2018 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, courtesy of the MIT Press. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/economics-philanthropy
Document Type: 
Preprint

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.