Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/182106
Authors: 
Boll, Christina
Lagemann, Andreas
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
HWWI Research Paper No. 183
Abstract: 
The present study examines, based on the Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) 2010 and 2014, the unadjusted gender pay gap of the public sector (economic sectors O (Public Administration, Defence, and compulsory Social Security) and P (Education)) compared to the private economy. The unadjusted gender pay gap in the public sector stood at 5.6 % in 2014 and was virtually unchanged compared to 2010. The gap in the private economy remained about four times as high. The wage advantage of women over men among part-time workers, both in the public and in the private sector, is due to the relatively high proportion of marginally and temporarily employed workers and the relatively short firm tenure among men. Among fulltime workers, the explained part of the gap is driven by the performance group. The findings once again underline the need to review gender-based access to leading positions in the public sector. The detailed decomposition of the explained part for all workers reveals that the advantageous distribution of performance groups and levels of education, as well as the lower rate of part-time employment among men, explains their earnings advantage. In the private economy, men also benefit from their employment in wage-attractive sectors.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
599.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.