Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/181484
Authors: 
Palley, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
FMM Working Paper 26
Abstract: 
Economic theory is prone to hysteresis. Once an idea is adopted, it is difficult to change. In the 1970s, the economics profession abandoned the Keynesian Phillips curve and adopted Milton Friedman's natural rate of unemployment (NRU) hypothesis. The shift was facilitated by a series of lucky breaks. Despite much evidence against the NRU, and much evidence and theoretical argument supportive of the Keynesian Phillips curve, the NRU hypothesis remains ascendant. The hypothesis has had an enormous impact on macroeconomic theory and policy. 2018 is the fiftieth anniversary of Friedman's introduction of the NRU hypothesis. The anniversary offers an opportunity to challenge, rather than celebrate it.
Subjects: 
Natural rate of unemployment
Keynesian Phillips curve
Friedman
Tobin
JEL: 
E00
E12
E20
E30
E60
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.