Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/177004
Authors: 
Bertoni, Marco
Brunello, Giorgio
Cappellari, Lorenzo
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 11200
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
We use Danish register data to investigate whether the effects of schoolmates' gender and average parental education on individual educational achievement, employment and earnings vary with individual family characteristics such as the gender of siblings and own parental education. We find that boys with sisters have worse employment prospects than boys with no sisters when exposed to a higher share of girls at school. The opposite is true for girls who have sisters. We also show that the benefits from exposure to "privileged" peers accrue mainly to "disadvantaged" students. These benefits decline when the dispersion of parental education increases. Overall, the size of the estimated effects is small.
Subjects: 
education peer effects
gender
parental background
human capital production
long term outcomes
JEL: 
I21
J16
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
851.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.