Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/173959
Authors: 
Belfield, Chris
Blundell, Richard
Cribb, Jonathan
Hood, Andrew
Joyce, Robert
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IFS Working Papers W17/01
Abstract: 
We study earnings and income inequality in Britain over the past two decades, including the period of relatively "inclusive" growth from 1997-2004 and the Great Recession. We focus on the middle 90%, where trends have contrasted strongly with the "new inequality" at the very top. Household earnings inequality has risen, driven by male earnings - although a 'catch-up' of female earnings did hold down individual earnings inequality and reduce within-household inequality. Nevertheless, net household income inequality fell due to deliberate increases in redistribution, the tax and transfer system's insurance role during the Great Recession, falling household worklessness, and rising pensioner incomes.
Subjects: 
inequality
labour market
household earnings
social security
JEL: 
D31
E24
J3
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
698.48 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.