Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/171200
Authors: 
Kleiner, Morris M.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 392
Abstract: 
Since the end of World War II, occupational licensing has been one of the fastest growing labor market institutions in the developed world. The economics literature suggests that licensing can influence wage determination, the speed at which workers find employment, pension and health benefits, and prices. Moreover, there is little evidence to show that licensing improves service quality, health, or safety in developed nations. So, why is occupational licensing is growing when there are such well-established costs to the public?
Subjects: 
occupational licensing
labor markets with regulation
wage determination with regulation
JEL: 
J44
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.