Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170900
Authors: 
Averett, Susan L.
Smith, Julie K.
Wang, Yang
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10916
Abstract: 
States are increasingly resorting to raising the minimum wage to boost the earnings of those at the bottom of the income distribution. In this paper, we examine the effects of minimum wage increases on the health of low-educated Hispanic women, who constitute a growing part of the U.S. labor force, are disproportionately represented in minimum wage jobs and typically have less access to health care. Using a difference-in-differences identification strategy and data drawn from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey and the Current Population Survey from the years 1994–2015, we find little evidence that low-educated Hispanic women likely affected by minimum wage increases experience any changes in health status, access to care, or use of preventive care.
Subjects: 
minimum wage
Hispanic women
health outcomes
health insurance
preventive care
JEL: 
J15
I12
I13
I14
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
299.9 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.