Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/167586
Authors: 
Schmitz, Sebastian
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper, School of Business & Economics: Economics 2017/21
Abstract: 
In January 2015, Germany introduced a federal, statutory minimum wage of 8.50 € per hour. This study evaluates the effects of this policy on regular and marginal employment and on welfare dependency. Based on county-level administrative data, this study uses the difference-in-differences technique, exploiting regional variation in the bite of the minimum wage, i.e. the county-specific share of employees paid less than 8.50 € before the introduction of the minimum wage. The minimum wage had a considerable negative effect on marginal employment. There is also some indication that regular employment was slightly reduced. Concerning welfare dependency, the minimum wage reduced the number of working welfare recipients, with some indication that about one half of them left welfare receipt due to the minimum wage.
Subjects: 
minimum wages
welfare dependency
labor supply
Germany
JEL: 
I38
J22
J30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.