Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163126
Authors: 
Cyron, Laura
Schwerdt, Guido
Viarengo, Martina
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
ADBI Working Paper Series 627
Abstract: 
We investigate the effect of having opposite sex siblings on cognitive and noncognitive skills of children in the United States at the onset of formal education. Our identification strategy rests on the assumption that, conditional on covariates, the sibling sex composition of the two firstborn children in a family is arguably exogenous. With regard to cognitive skills, learning skills, and self-control measured in kindergarten, we find that boys benefit from having a sister, while there is no effect for girls. We also find evidence for the effect fading out as early as first grade.
Subjects: 
sibling gender effects
gender peer effects
education
cognitive skills
noncognitive skills
early childhood
JEL: 
I2
J13
J16
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
347.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.