Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/161276
Authors: 
Bubonya, Melisa
Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.
Ribar, David C.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10653
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes the bilateral relationship between depressive symptoms and employment status. We find that severe depressive symptoms are partially a consequence of economic inactivity. The incidence of depressive symptoms is higher if individuals have been out of a job for an extended period. Men's mental health falls as they exit the labor force, while women's worsens only after they have been out of the labor force for a period of time. Entering unemployment is also associated with a substantial deterioration in mental health, particularly for men. We also find that severe depressive symptoms, in turn, lead to economic inactivity. Individuals are less likely to be labor force participants or employed if they experience severe depressive symptoms. Men's probability of being unemployed rises dramatically with the onset of depressive symptoms; women's unemployment is increased by protracted depressive symptoms.
Subjects: 
mental health
unemployment
labor market status
HILDA survey
depressive symptoms
depression
JEL: 
J01
J64
I14
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
536.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.