Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/158702
Authors: 
Pollmann-Schult, Matthias
Year of Publication: 
2009
Citation: 
[Journal:] Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung – Journal for Labour Market Research [ISSN:] 2510-5027 [Volume:] 42 [Year:] 2009 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 140-154
Abstract (Translated): 
This research examines changes in job values of women and men from 1980 to 2000 using data from the ALLBUS. Here we address the question of whether gender differences in job values are of particular importance to explain sex segregation in the labour market. Our results suggest that men tend to place a higher value on extrinsic rewards and women attach greater importance to altruistic rewards than men do. However, these gender differences are limited and have narrowed in recent years. In the early 1980s men attached more importance to income and chances of promotion than women did and women indicated a stronger preference to having opportunities to help others, whereas in 2000, we observe gender differences only with regard to altruistic job values. The relatively small gender differences in job values suggest that supply-side explanations for sex segregation - derived from neoclassical and socialisation theory - do not significantly contribute to explain sex segregation in the labour market.
Subjects: 
Wertorientierung
Wertwandel
Männer
Frauen
Arbeitswelt
Segregation - Determinanten
Westdeutschland
Bundesrepublik Deutschland
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.