Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/157267
Authors: 
Borrowman, Mary
Klasen, Stephan
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 222
Abstract: 
Occupational and sectoral segregation by gender is remarkably persistent across space and time and is a major contributor to gender wage gaps. We investigate the determinants of one-digit occupational and sectoral segregation in developing countries using a unique, household-survey based aggregate data base including 69 developing countries between 1980 and 2011. We first show that occupational and sectoral segregation has increased in more countries over time than it has decreased. Using fixed effect panel regressions, we find that income levels have no impact on occupational or sectoral segregation. Rising female labor force participation is associated with falling sectoral but increasing occupational segregation; rising education levels, either overall or for females relative to males, tends to increase rather than decrease segregation.
Subjects: 
occupational segregation
sectoral segregation
gender
developing countries
JEL: 
J16
J24
J31
J71
B54
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
678.67 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.