Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/154724
Authors: 
Kondo, Ayako
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Policy [ISSN:] 2193-9004 [Volume:] 5 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 1-23
Abstract: 
This paper examines the effect of increased elderly employment in Japan, caused by the legal obligation of continued employment enacted in 2006, on employment of other workers and elderly's own earnings. I find no evidence for substitution between young full-time workers and elderly workers, while there might be a modest crowd out of middle-aged female part-time workers. I also find a substantial decline in earnings of baby boomers, who reached age 60 after 2006, in their early sixties. These results suggest that firms primarily cut wages of elderly workers, and some firms reduced the number of female part-time workers.
Subjects: 
Elderly employment
Youth employment
JEL: 
J26
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
892.83 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.