Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152408
Authors: 
Liaqat, Zara
Nugent, Jeffrey B.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor & Development [ISSN:] 2193-9020 [Volume:] 4 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 12 [Pages:] 1-29
Abstract: 
This paper shows that firms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) provide training to their workers less frequently than firms in other regions and yet seem to be more in need of it. Utilizing firm level data from the Enterprise Surveys for over 100 countries, it attempts to explain that paradox and also identify alternative policy actions that MENA countries might use to substantially increase firm-supplied training by MENA firms. In particular, it points to the potential usefulness of reforms of labor regulations in MENA countries to be less rigid, but also coupling this with stronger enforcement so as to encourage existing firms to be more formal and new firms to enter, grow in size and adopt characteristics more favorable to training over time.
Subjects: 
Training
Labor regulations
Enforcement
Middle east
Education-skills mismatch
JEL: 
J41
J58
O15
O53
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
557.99 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.