Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152371
Authors: 
Brenčič, Vera
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Economics [ISSN:] 2193-8997 [Volume:] 5 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 7 [Pages:] 1-15
Abstract: 
Craigslist, a website that hosts job- and help-wanted ads, expanded rapidly across the states in the USA over a very short period of time, thereby changing abruptly the market structure faced by competing employment websites. We exploit this abrupt change to evaluate its impact on competing websites' online traffic and pricing. We find that Craigslist's entry was associated with a decrease in the number of visitors that an average competing employment website attracted and with a decrease in the number of pages an average visitor reviewed during a typical visit. We also find that employment websites lowered some of the fees they charged their users. Overall, these findings offer one explanation for why Craigslist, despite its popularity, had little effect on the unemployment rate in the labor markets it entered: the entry of Craigslist cannibalized online traffic at competing employment websites.
Subjects: 
Entry response
Employment website
Craigslist
JEL: 
J20
L10
L86
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
479.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.