Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/152363
Authors: 
Addison, John T.
Blackburn, McKinley L.
Cotti, Chad D.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Labor Economics [ISSN:] 2193-8997 [Volume:] 4 [Year:] 2015 [Pages:] 1-16
Abstract: 
Recent attempts to incorporate spatial heterogeneity in minimum-wage employment models have been targeted for using overly simplistic trend controls and for neglecting the potential impact of wage minima on employment growth. This paper investigates whether such considerations call into question findings of statistically insignificant employment effects reported in the literature for an archetypal low-wage sector in the United States: restaurants and bars. Understanding this relationship goes to the heart of the policy debate surrounding minimum wages and, hence, is critical to investigate carefully. Our results conclude that a focus on employment levels is appropriate for this sector and, further, that the deployment of nonlinear trend controls does not dislodge prior research which finds weak support for the existence of adverse minimum-wage employment effects on employment.
Subjects: 
Minimum wages
Employment
Employment change
Spatial controls
JEL: 
J23
J38
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
359.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.