Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/151086
Authors: 
Clemens, Marius
Schumacher, Dieter
Year of Publication: 
2010
Citation: 
[Journal:] Weekly Report [ISSN:] 1860-3343 [Year:] 2010 [Volume:] 6 [Issue:] 11 [Pages:] 79-85
Abstract: 
Germany is the world's biggest gross and net exporter of research-intensive goods, even ahead of the US and Japan. Per capita Germany also has the largest export surplus for research-intensive goods with around USD 3,900. Furthermore, Germany increasingly benefits as an importer - and thus as a user of technologies - from the international division of work. However, Germany's comparative advantages for research-intensive goods have declined in comparison to the middle of the 1990s. This is not due to a change in export specializations but rather to the tremendous increase in imports; this is reflected above all in the medium and low price segments where emerging markets have been catching up in research-intensive goods. After the financial market crisis had its impact on the real economy, it is now even more important to strengthen the innovative capabilities of German companies. The most important prerequisite of ensuring this is being equipped with R&D and human capital.
Subjects: 
International trade
Country and industry studies of trade
Industrialization
Manufacturing and service industries
Choice of technology
JEL: 
F10
F14
O14
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.