Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/151060
Authors: 
von Schlippenbach, Vanessa
Teichmann, Isabel
Year of Publication: 
2009
Citation: 
[Journal:] Weekly Report [ISSN:] 1860-3343 [Year:] 2009 [Volume:] 5 [Issue:] 21 [Pages:] 145-153
Abstract: 
Horticulture has developed into one of the most dynamic agricultural sectors in the world. The cultivation of fruits and vegetables has significant potential for increasing agricultural income and reducing rural poverty, particularly in developing and emerging countries. However, it appears that the growing consolidation in the retail sector has shifted power relations along the value-added chain away from producers to retailers. In addition, food retailers rely more and more on their own quality standards. The growing significance of such private standards could help to guarantee the functioning of markets and, ultimately, market access. Yet, it could also increase bilateral dependencies and the risk that producers further up the supply chain are exploited. In turn, this could hinder market access, particularly for small-scale farmers. Public standards offer a reasonable alternative: they create transparency and equal rules for all market participants.
Subjects: 
Private Standards
Minimum Quality Standards
Rural Development
High-Value Crops
JEL: 
L15
Q17
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.