Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/150906
Authors: 
Muffels, Ruud
Kemperman, Bauke
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 361
Abstract: 
The study examines the effects of work orientations and work-leisure choices alongside the effect of genes or personality traits on subjective well-being (SWB). The former effects are assumed to be mediated by the match between women's preferred and actual number of working hours indicating labor market and time constraints. Data come from 24 waves of the German (SOEP) Household Panel (1984-2007). Random and fixed-effect panel regression models are estimated. Work orientations and work-leisure choices indeed matter for women's SWB but the effects are strongly mediated by the job match especially for younger birth cohorts and higher educated women. Therefore, apart from the impact of genes or personality traits preferences and choices as well as labor market and time constraints matter significantly for the well-being of women, providing partial support to the role (scarcity-expansion) theory and the combination pressure thesis while at the same time challenging set-point theory.
Subjects: 
Subjective well-being
set-point theory
life satisfaction
preference formation theory
role (scarcity-expansion) theory
job match
work-leisure choices
panel regression models
JEL: 
I32
J21
J24
J64
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
742.02 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.