Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/148507
Authors: 
Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2016 [Issue:] 282
Abstract: 
More than 100 million women and girls in the world have had their genitals cut for cultural, religious, or other non-medical reasons. Even though international organizations condemn female genital mutilation (FGM), or cutting, as a violation of human rights, and most nations have banned it, it remains prevalent in many African countries, and is slow to decline. This persistence raises questions about the effectiveness of international and national laws prohibiting the practice as well as the potential role of returning migrants in changing embedded cultural norms. Does migration change migrants’ opinions and attitudes to this custom? If so, do they transfer the new norms to their origin countries?
Subjects: 
migration
social norms
female genital mutilation (FGM)
Africa
JEL: 
I15
O55
F22
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.