Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/147869
Authors: 
Artz, Benjamin
Goodall, Amanda H.
Oswald, Andrew J.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10183
Abstract: 
Women typically earn less than men. The reasons are not fully understood. Previous studies argue that this may be because (i) women 'don't ask' and (ii) the reason they fail to ask is out of concern for the quality of their relationships at work. This account is difficult to assess with standard labor-economics data sets. Hence we examine direct survey evidence. Using matched employer-employee data from 2013-14, the paper finds that the women-don't-ask account is incorrect. Once an hours-of-work variable is included in 'asking' equations, hypotheses (i) and (ii) can be rejected. Women do ask. However, women do not get.
Subjects: 
matched employer-employee data
female discrimination
wages
gender
JEL: 
J31
J71
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
184.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.