Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/144241
Authors: 
Anderson, Ronald W.
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Research 27
Abstract: 
This paper is an exploration of the relationships among the firm's financial structure, its choice of liquid asset holdings, and growth. We present a theoretical model of the firm where external finance is costly and where retaining earnings as liquid assets serves a precautionary motive. One of the predictions of this model is that a long-term reliance on high levels of debt finance tends to be associated with high levels of liquid asset holding. We test this empirically by estimating the determinants of liquid asset holdings using panel data sets of Belgian and UK firms. We find evidence of a positive relation between leverage and liquid asset holding. This result leads us to identify a possible linkage from high debt to high liquidity to slow growth. In light of this we discuss the possible implications of the development of stock markets, private equity, and venture capital markets.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
352.64 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.