Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/141647
Authors: 
Clotfelter, Charles T.
Hemelt, Steven W.
Ladd, Helen F.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9888
Abstract: 
Launched in 2004, the Carolina Covenant combines grant-heavy financial aid with an array of non-financial supports for low-income students at an elite public university. We find that the program increased four-year graduation rates by about 8 percentage points for eligible students in the cohorts who experienced the fully developed program. For these cohorts, we also find suggestive effects on persistence to the fourth year of college, cumulative earned credits, and academic performance. We conclude that aid programs targeting low-income, high-ability students are most successful when they couple grant aid with strong non-financial supports.
Subjects: 
postsecondary completion
financial aid
JEL: 
I21
I22
I23
I24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
361.42 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.