Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/130373
Authors: 
Lindahl, Mikael
Lundberg, Evelina
Palme, Mårten
Simeonova, Emilia
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9688
Abstract: 
To what extent is the length of our lives determined by pre-birth factors? And to what extent is it affected by parental resources during our upbringing that can be influenced by public policy? We study the formation of adult health and mortality using data on about 21,000 adoptees born between 1940 and 1967. The data include detailed information on both biological and adopting parents. We find that the health of the biological parents affects the health of their adopted children. Thus, we confirm that genes and conditions in utero are important intergenerational transmission channels for long-term health. However, we also find strong evidence that the educational attainment of the adopting mother has a significant impact on the health of her adoptive children, suggesting that family environment and resources in the post-birth years have long-term consequences for children's health.
Subjects: 
health inequality
mortality
pre- versus post-birth decomposition
JEL: 
I10
I14
I24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
874.84 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.