Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/130344
Authors: 
Easterlin, Richard A.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9676
Abstract: 
Or Paradox Regained? The answer is Paradox Regained. New data confirm that for countries worldwide long-term trends in happiness and real GDP per capita are not significantly positively related. The principal reason that Paradox critics reach a different conclusion, aside from problems of data comparability, is that they do not focus on identifying long-term trends in happiness. For some countries their estimated growth rates of happiness and GDP are not trend rates, but those observed in cyclical expansion or contraction. Mixing these short-term with long-term growth rates shifts a happiness-GDP regression from a horizontal to positive slope.
Subjects: 
Easterlin Paradox
economic growth
income
happiness
life satisfaction
subjective well-being
transition countries
less developed nations
developed countries
long-term
short-term
trends
fluctuations
JEL: 
I31
D60
O10
O5
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.58 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.