Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/127298
Authors: 
Warziniack, Travis
Finnoff, David
Shogren, Jason F.
Bossenbroek, Jonathan
Lodge, David
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics 481
Abstract: 
This paper develops a general equilibrium model to measure welfare effects of taxes for correcting environmental externalities caused by domestic trade, focusing on exter- nalities that arise through exports. Externalities from exports come from a number of sources. Domestically owned ships, planes, and automobiles can become contaminated while visiting other regions and bring unwanted pests home, and species can be in- troduced by contaminated visitors that enter a region to consume goods and services. The paper combines insights from the public finance literature on corrective environ- mental taxes and trade literature on domestically provided services. We find that past methods for measuring welfare effects are inadequate for a wide range of externalities and show the most widely used corrective mechanism, taxes on the sector imposing the environmental externality, may often do more harm than good. The motivation for this paper is the expansion of invasive species' ranges within the United States. We apply our analytical model to the specifc example of quagga and zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena rostiformis bugenis) invasion into the U.S Pacific Northwest.
Subjects: 
environmental regulation
tax interactions
invasive species
environment and trade
JEL: 
Q20
Q26
Q27
Q56
Q57
F18
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
564.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.