Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125440
Authors: 
Daysal, N. Meltem
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 217
Abstract: 
Ample empirical evidence links adverse conditions during early childhood (the period from conception to age five) to worse health outcomes and lower academic achievement in adulthood. Can early-life medical care and public health interventions ameliorate these effects? Recent research suggests that both types of interventions may benefit not only child health but also long-term educational outcomes. In addition, early-life medical interventions may improve the educational outcomes of siblings. These findings can be used to design policies that improve long-term outcomes and reduce economic inequality.
Subjects: 
medical care
public health
children
schooling
test scores
human capital
JEL: 
I11
I12
I18
I21
J13
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.