Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125375
Authors: 
Giannelli, Gianna Claudia
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 157
Abstract: 
Engaging in paid work is generally difficult for women in developing countries. Many women work unpaid in family businesses or on farms, are engaged in low-income self-employment activities, or work in low-paid wage employment. In some countries, vocational training or grants for starting a business have been effective policy tools for supporting women’s paid work. Mostly lacking, however, are job and business training programs that take into account how mothers’ employment affects child welfare. Access to free or subsidized public childcare can increase women’s labor force participation and improve children’s well-being.
Subjects: 
female employment
paid work
vocational training
cash grants
child well-being
JEL: 
I25
J13
J16
J22
J61
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.