Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125374
Authors: 
Giulietti, Corrado
Year of Publication: 
2015
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2015 [Issue:] 151
Abstract: 
An increase in the minimum wage in immigrant destination countries raises the earnings that low-skilled migrants could expect to attain if they were to migrate. While some studies for the US indicate that a higher minimum wage induces immigration, contrasting evidence shows that immigrants are less likely to move into areas with higher or more frequent increases in the minimum wage. These different findings seem to reflect different relocation decisions by immigrants who have lived in the US for several years, who are more likely to move in response to higher minimum wages, and by new immigrants, who are less likely to move.
Subjects: 
minimum wage
immigration
low-educated workers
JEL: 
J08
J23
J61
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.