Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/125324
Authors: 
Zavodny, Madeline
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA World of Labor [ISSN:] 2054-9571 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 98
Abstract: 
According to economic theory, a minimum wage reduces the number of low-wage jobs and increases the number of available workers, allowing greater hiring selectivity. More competition for a smaller number of low-wage jobs will disadvantage immigrants if employers perceive them as less skilled than native-born workers--and vice versa. Studies indicate that a higher minimum wage does not hurt immigrants, but there is no consensus on whether immigrants benefit at the expense of natives. Studies also reach disparate conclusions on whether higher minimum wages attract or repel immigrants.
Subjects: 
minimum wage
immigrants
low-skilled workers
JEL: 
J61
J38
J15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.