Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/118691
Authors: 
Eichner, Thomas
Pethig, Rüdiger
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge, Universität Siegen, Fachbereich Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht 174-15
Abstract: 
Ecological systems (ecosystems, for short) are complex systems of interacting species, plants and animals, where each of the species consists of individual organisms that interact with organisms of the same or other species in various ways: they compete for scare resources and they are involved in predator-prey or mutualistic relationships. The challenge to understand the performance and changes of ecosystems over time was taken up long time ago by ecologists. In the ecological literature a vast number of models address ecosystem dynamics, taking populations as the relevant endogenous variables and investigating how populations develop and interact over· time. For brevity, we call them ecological population models. Many of them focus on the simplest case of a single species as an aggregate entity developing over time. The prototype (heuristic) model for one large homogenous population in a constant environment is the logistic growth curve based on the so-called Verhulst-Pearl equation. Pierre Francois Verhulst (1838) introduced the logistic equation and Raymond Pearl (1930) applied it to population growth in the US; this equation turned out to become an important analytical tool in ecosystem analysis...
Subjects: 
ecosystem
organism
species
biomass
population
JEL: 
Q50
Q57
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.