Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/114038
Authors: 
Meng, Xin
Yamauchi, Chikako
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 9165
Abstract: 
In the past 15 years around 160 million Chinese rural workers migrated to cities to work. Because of restrictions on migrant access to local health and education system a large cohort of migrant children are left-behind in rural villages and growing up without parental care. This paper examines how parental migration affects children's health and education outcomes. Using the Rural-Urban Migration Survey in China (RUMiC) data we are able to measure the share of children's lifetime during which parents migrated away from home. By instrumenting this measure of parental migration with weather changes in their home village when they were young we find a sizable adverse impact of exposure to parental migration on children's health and education outcomes. We also find that what the literature has always done (using contemporaneous measure for parental migration) is likely to underestimate the effect of exposure to parental migration on children's outcomes.
Subjects: 
migration
children
education
health
China
JEL: 
J38
I28
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
641.43 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.