Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/110087
Authors: 
Jetter, Michael
Walker, Jay K.
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 8934
Abstract: 
This paper analyzes potential gender differences in competitive environments using a sample of over 100,000 professional tennis matches. We focus on two phenomena of the labor and sports economics literature: the hot-hand and clutch-player effects. First, we find strong evidence for the hot-hand (cold-hand) effect. Every additional win in the most recent ten Tour matches raises the likelihood of prevailing in the current encounter by 3.1 (males) to 3.3 percentage points (females). Second, top male and female players are excelling in Grand Slam tournaments, arguably the most important events in tennis. For men, we also find evidence for top players winning more tie-breaks at Grand Slams. Overall, we find virtually no gender differences for the hot-hand effect and only minor distinctions for the clutch-player effect.
Subjects: 
gender gap
competition
hot hand
clutch player
tennis
JEL: 
J24
L83
D84
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
325.94 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.