Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/108505
Authors: 
Keller, Tamás
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market BWP - 2014/9
Abstract: 
Why are talented pupils who come from low-status families reluctant to choose knowledge-intensive educational routes? Throughout this paper we try to answer this question, employing the framework of sociological rational choice theory. Our argumentation is that (1) the perception of one's own ability (self-assessment) is dissimilar among pupils with different parental backgrounds. Furthermore, (2) educational choices are influenced not exclusively by ability, but also by subjective beliefs about one's own talent. Finally, (3) educational choices are not identical across social classes, because pupils with different parental backgrounds estimate their own abilities differently. The hypotheses are tested using individual-level panel data from the Hungarian Life Course Survey (HLCS). The sample contains 9,050 pupils (aged 14-15) who finished primary education in the academic year 2005/06, began secondary education in autumn 2006, and tertiary education in 2010 or 2011.
Subjects: 
self-assessment
self-confidence
transition to secondary and tertiary education
school tracks
inequality in educational opportunities
tracking in education
educational panel data
Hungarian Life Course Survey (HLCS)
JEL: 
D83
J24
I24
J62
ISBN: 
978-615-5447-57-0
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.