Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/104415
Authors: 
Schudy, Simeon
Utikal, Verena
Year of Publication: 
2014
Series/Report no.: 
Munich Discussion Paper 2014-4
Abstract: 
We provide evidence that people have preferences for data privacy and show that these preferences partly reflect people’s interest in controlling who receives their private information. Participants of an experiment face the decision to share validated personal information with peers. We compare preferences for sharing potentially embarrassing information (body weight and height) and non-embarrassing information (address data) with geographically proximate or distant peers. We find that i) participants are willing to give up substantial monetary amounts in order to keep both types of information private, ii) data types are valued differently, and iii) prices for potentially embarrassing information tend to be higher for geographically proximate than distant peers.
Subjects: 
preferences
data privacy
information transmission
experiment
JEL: 
C91
D80
D82
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.