Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/49863
Authors: 
Ben-Shalom, Yonatan
Moffitt, Robert
Scholz, John Karl
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Working papers // the Johns Hopkins University, Department of Economics 579 [rev.]
Abstract: 
We assess the effectiveness of means-tested and social insurance programs in the United States. We show that per capita expenditures on these programs as a whole have grown over time but expenditures on some programs have declined. The benefit system in the U.S. has a major impact on poverty rates, reducing the percent poor in 2004 from 29 percent to 13.5 percent, estimates which are robust to different measures of the poverty line. We find that, while there are significant behavioral side effects of many programs, their aggregate impact is very small and does not affect the magnitude of the aggregate poverty impact of the system. The system reduces poverty the most for the disabled and the elderly and least for several groups among the non-elderly and non-disabled. Over time, we find that expenditures have shifted toward the disabled and the elderly, and away from those with the lowest incomes and toward those with higher incomes, with the consequence that post-transfer rates of deep poverty for some groups have increased. We conclude that the U.S. benefit system is paternalistic and tilted toward the support of the employed and toward groups with special needs and perceived deservingness.
Subjects: 
Transfer Programs
Poverty
Inequality
Labor Supply
JEL: 
H5
D3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
722.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.