Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/37111
Authors: 
Strulik, Holger
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Diskussionspapiere der Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät // Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Leibniz Universität Hannover 441
Abstract: 
This paper theoretically investigates how community approval or disapproval affects school attendance and child labor and how aggregate behavior of the community feeds back towards the formation and persistence of an anti- (or pro-) schooling norm. The proposed community-model continues to take aggregate and idiosyncratic poverty into account as an important driver of low school attendance and child labor. But it provides also an explanation for why equally poor villages or regions can display different attitudes towards schooling. Distinguishing between three different modes of child time allocation, school attendance, work, and leisure, the paper shows how the time costs of schooling and child labor productivity contribute to the existence of a locally stable anti-schooling norm. It proposes policies that effectively exploit the social dynamics and initiate a permanent escape from the anti-schooling equilibrium. An extension of the model explores how an education contingent subsidy paid to the poorest families of a community manages to initiate a bandwagon effect towards 'education for all'. The optimal mechanism design of such a targeted transfer program is investigated.
Subjects: 
School Attendance
Child Labor
Social Norms
Targeted Transfers
JEL: 
I20
I29
J13
O12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
500.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.