Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34933
Authors: 
Billger, Sherrilyn M.
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3162
Abstract: 
Increasing interest in voucher programs and privatizing public schools reveals a commonly-held belief that private schools are better able to produce a quality education. While state and national standards do not directly affect these schools, their private control yields strong student performance. To contribute to the general discovery about private schools, I use SASS and Census data to investigate accountability and outcomes at private secondary schools, focusing on principals, student outcomes, and administrator effectiveness. I find that principals are not rewarded for facing accountability or for exercising autonomy. OLS and quantile regression results also suggest no direct benefit for strong students at high quality schools. However, accountability does improve student outcomes at the (conditionally) weakest schools.
Subjects: 
Principal pay
accountability
private schools
JEL: 
J3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
233.71 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.