Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Neumark, David
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3355
The principal means by which individuals and families achieve economic self-sufficiency is through labor market earnings. As a consequence, it is natural for policy makers to look to interventions that increase the ability of individuals and families to achieve an adequate standard of living from participating in the labor market - a goal that has become even more prominent in the post-welfare reform era in the United States. This paper discusses some key policies that are used or can be used to increase economic self-sufficiency by increasing earnings, including mandating higher wages, subsidizing work, and increasing skill formation. Specifically, it reviews evidence on some of the main policies currently in place in the United States, including minimum and living wages, the Earned Income Tax Credit, wage subsidies, and school-to-work programs. Finally, it considers alternative policies that have recently been proposed.
Minimum wages
living wages
earned income tax credit
wage subsidies
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
665.97 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.