Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/92244
Authors: 
Bonin, Holger
Constant, Amelie
Tatsiramons, Konstantinos
Zimmermann, Klaus F.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] IZA Journal of Migration [ISSN:] 2193-9039 [Publisher:] Springer [Place:] Heidelberg [Volume:] 1 [Year:] 2012 [Pages:] 1-23
Abstract: 
This paper investigates whether immigrants adapt to the attitudes of the majority population in the host country by focusing on the effect of ethnic persistence and assimilation on individual risk proclivity. Employing information from a unique representative German survey, we find that adaptation to the host country closes the existing immigrant-native gap in risk proclivity by reducing immigrants' risk aversion and explains the systematic variation in the observed risk attitudes across immigrants of different origins. Our analysis of the adaptation behavior of immigrants suggests that acquisition of social norms is an essential factor in the formation of individual attitudes.
Subjects: 
risk attitudes
ethnic persistence
assimilation
second generation effects
gender
JEL: 
D1
D81
F22
J15
J16
J31
J62
J82
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
218.69 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.