Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/88332
Authors: 
Eguavoen, Irit
Schulz, Karsten
de Wit, Sara
Weisser, Florian
Müller-Mahn, Detlef
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
ZEF Working Paper Series 120
Abstract: 
This paper supports the argument that social science research should focus on adaptation to climate change as a social and political process, by analyzing the politics and interests of actors in climate change adaptation arenas, and by acknowledging the active role of those people who are expected to adapt. Most conventional climate research depoliticizes vulnerability and adaptation by removing dominant global economic and policy conditions from the discussion. Social science disciplines, if given appropriate weight in multidisciplinary projects, contribute important analyses by relying on established concepts from political science, human geography, and social anthropology. This paper explains relevant disciplinary concepts (climate change adaptation arena, governance, politics, perception, mental models, weather discourses, risk, blame, travelling ideas) and relates them to each other to facilitate the use of a common terminology and conceptual framework for research in a developmental context.
Subjects: 
climate change adaptation arena
governance
politics
perception
mental models
weather discourse
risk
blame
travelling ideas
discourse
development
Africa
teaching material
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
457.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.