Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/75033
Authors: 
Damijan, Jože P.
Rojec, Matija
Majcen, Boris
Knell, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper 218
Abstract: 
This paper presents a comparative study of the importance of direct technology transfer and spillovers through FDI on a set of ten transition countries, using a common methodology and appropriate methods to account for selection and simultaneity correction. This paper considers by far the largest firm level dataset (more than 90,000 firms) used by any study on the spillover effects of FDI. The main novelty of the paper is the explicit control for various sources of firm heterogeneity when accounting for different effects of FDI on firm perfirmance. Controlling for these variables leads to some interesting results which contrast with the previous empirical work in the field. We find that horizontal spillovers have become increasingly important over the last decade, and they may even become more important than vertical spillovers. Furthfirmore, this work shows that the heterogeneity of firms in tfirms of absorptive capacity, size, productivity and technology levels affect the results. These findings suggest that both direct effects from foreign ownership as well as the spillovers from foreign firms substantially depend on the absorptive capacity and productivity level of individual firms. Only more productive firms and firms with higher absorptive capacities are able to both compete with foreign affiliates in the same sector and benefit from the increased upstream demand for intfirmediates generated by foreign affiliates. In addition, these results show that foreign presence may also affect smaller firms to a larger extent than larger firms, but this impact may be in either direction.
Subjects: 
Foreign direct investment
technology transfer
spillovers
transition economies
firm heterogeneity
JEL: 
D24
F14
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.04 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.