Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/70189
Authors: 
Kataria, Mitesh
Montinari, Natalia
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Jena Economic Research Papers 2012,061
Abstract: 
Researchers frequently studied the casual relationships of other-regarding preferences by applying experimental methods in bilateral settings (e.g., dictator game and ultimatum game). We use a framed experiment on taxes to study preferences for redistribution in a multi-person setting. We find presence of heterogeneous preferences with a substantial share of tax rate choices in line with both payoff maximization and other-regarding preferences. Notably, our data is not consistent with inequality aversion but points to other forms of other-regarding preferences, as fairness and altruism. By manipulating how subjects are assigned to a given level of pre-tax income, we vary the individual entitlements. We find a difference in the willingness to redistribute income when comparing the treatment where pre-tax income is assigned by relative performance in a production task (a general knowledge quiz) to the treatment where pre-tax income is assigned by luck. We do not find any significant difference in comparison to the intermediate treatment where pre-tax income is assigned by a combination of luck and performance. The perception of a fair tax is different depending on whether subjects' pre-tax income is below or above average, which is in line with a fairness bias. Finally, subjects not knowing whether their pre-tax income is below or above the average when choosing the tax rate behave as if they were more other-regarding.
Subjects: 
Redistribution
Entitlements
Fairness Bias
Risk
Framed Tax Experiment
JEL: 
D6
C9
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
591.67 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.