Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Schmidt, Christian W.
Broll, Udo
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Dresden discussion paper series in economics 09/08
This paper empirically analyzes the impact of exchange rate uncertainty, exchange rate movements and expectations on foreign direct investment (FDI). Two competing specifications of exchange rate volatility are examined. The investigation is based on a cross-section time-series data set of U.S. outward FDI by industries to six major partner countries for the period 1984-2004. Using the standard deviation of the real exchange rate as a measure of risk it is found that exchange rate uncertainty has a discouraging effect on FDI flows across all industries. This is contrasted when applying an alternative risk specification defined as the unexplained part of real exchange rate volatility. Now, results show a clear distinction between non-manufacturing and manufacturing industries. U.S. FDI outflows in nonmanufacturing industries exhibit a positive correlation with increased exchange risk, whereas this relationship is negative for manufacturing industries in the underlying sample. A real appreciation of host-country currency was associated with higher FDI flows, while expectations about an appreciation showed a negative result.
Foreign direct investment
real exchange rate risk
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
700.76 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.